Water and Sanitation Hygiene Knowledge Attitude Practice in Urban Slum Settings

Ashish Joshi, Satish Prasad, Jyoti B Kasav, Mehak Segan, Awnish K Singh

Abstract


Background: Access to improved drinking water, sanitation and hygiene is one of the prime concerns around the globe. This study aimed at assessing water and sanitation hygiene-related attitude and practices, and quality of water in urban slums of south Delhi, India.

Methodology: This pilot cross sectional study was performed during July 2013 across four urban slums of South Delhi. A convenient sample of 40 participants was enrolled. A modified version of previously validated questionnaire was used to gather information on socio-demographics, existing water and sanitation facilities and water treatment practices. Water quality testing was additionally performed using hydrogen sulphide (H2S) vials.

Results: Average age of participants was 36 years (SD=10). 83% of the participants perceived gastrointestinal tract infection as the most important health problem. 75% of the participants did not use any method for drinking water treatment. 45% of the participants consumed water from privately-owned tube well/ bore well. Water shortage lasted two days or more (50%) at a stretch with severe scarcity occurring twice a year (40%). Females aged 15 years and above were largely responsible (93%) for fetching water from water source. 45% of the participants had toilets within their households. 53% of drinking water samples collected from storage containers showed positive bacteriological contamination.

Discussion: There is an urgent need to develop family centered educational programs that would enhance awareness about water treatment methods that are cost effective and easily accessible.


Full Text: PDF DOI: 10.5539/gjhs.v6n2p23

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Global Journal of Health Science   ISSN 1916-9736(Print)   ISSN 1916-9744(Online)

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