Composition and Emulsifying Characteristics of Grasscutter Meat from Varying Dietary Energy Levels

G. S. I. Wogar, M. L. Ufot, A. J. Henry, I. E. Inyang, E. E. Efe

Abstract


Sixteen (16) grasscutters (Thryonomys swinderianus) used for this study had been fed, in groups of four, one of four treatment diets namely; 2000, 2200, 2400, and 2600 kcalME/kg respectively. Two grasscutters were randomly selected from each treatment group for slaughter. Equal weights (150g) of meat samples collected from the forelimbs and hindlimbs of each slaughtered grasscutter were mixed, packed in waterproof plastic bags and stored overnight at -2oC hter. Equal weights (150g) of meat samples collected from the forelimbs and hindlimbs of each slaughtered grasscutter were mixed, packed in waterproof plastic bags and stored overnight at -2oC. The chemical composition and emulsifying characteristics of the meat samples were determined. It was found that the chemical composition and emulsifying characteristics (including protein content, emulsifying capacity, water holding capacity, emulsion stability and cooking loss) of grasscutter meat from varying dietary energy levels were significantly (P<0.05) different. These findings indicate that the protein content and emulsifying characteristics were significantly higher for meat from grasscutters fed the 2000 kcalME/kg diet than for meat from grasscutters fed the higher dietary energy levels. e; a positive interaction by increasing soil water content in root zone versus a negative interaction by decreasing diurnal soil temperatures to suboptimal values especially before wheat heading. Low soil temperatures under sludge may become critical for shoot propagation and head density at sub-optimal temperatures of cold years for wheat growth.. The chemical composition and emulsifying characteristics of the meat samples were determined. It was found that the chemical composition and emulsifying characteristics (including protein content, emulsifying capacity, water holding capacity, emulsion stability and cooking loss) of grasscutter meat from varying dietary energy levels were significantly (P<0.05) different. These findings indicate that the protein content and emulsifying characteristics were significantly higher for meat from grasscutters fed the 2000 kcalME/kg diet than for meat from grasscutters fed the higher dietary energy levels. e; a positive interaction by increasing soil water content in root zone versus a negative interaction by decreasing diurnal soil temperatures to suboptimal values especially before wheat heading. Low soil temperatures under sludge may become critical for shoot propagation and head density at sub-optimal temperatures of cold years for wheat growth.

Full Text: PDF DOI: 10.5539/jas.v5n1p314

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Journal of Agricultural Science ISSN 1916-9752 (Print) ISSN 1916-9760 (Online)

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