Predictors of Job Satisfaction among Emerging Adults in Alberta, Canada

Abu Sadat Nurullah

Abstract


This study explores the aspect of satisfaction with jobs and career, and the predictors of job satisfaction among the emerging adults in Alberta. Obtaining data from the 2003 Alberta High School Graduate Survey among a sample of 1,030 emerging adults from Alberta, the paper examines the predictive value of self-esteem, happiness, work-reward preferences, valued job characteristics, income, education, occupational categories, and other demographic variables on job satisfaction among the emerging adults. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), a job satisfaction model has been developed. The findings indicate that self-esteem and valued job characteristics are direct and strongest predictors of job satisfaction among the emerging adults. In addition, happiness and income positively predicts job satisfaction. The variable ‘work-reward preferences’ does not directly predict job satisfaction, but rather is mediated through self-esteem and valued job characteristics. Discussion includes limitation, future research direction, and policy implications.

Keywords: job satisfaction, self-esteem, happiness, work-reward preferences, valued job characteristics, income


Full Text: PDF DOI: 10.5539/ijbm.v5n3p3

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

International Journal of Business and Management   ISSN 1833-3850 (Print)   ISSN 1833-8119 (Online)

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