Educating Prisoners of Tradition: Visual Narratives of Afghan Women on Social Media

Esmaeil Zeiny Jelodar, Ruzy Suliza Hashim, Noraini Md Yusof, Raihanah M. M., Shahizah Ismail Hamdan, Peivand Zandi

Abstract


More than a decade after the US-led intervention of Afghanistan, traditional and tribal customs still play a significant role in the everyday lives of people, especially women. History has proven that women have been playing a significant role in shaping the course of Afghanistan but unfortunately, they are always subjected to different degrees of force by patriarchy and traditions. By examining the historical perspective of women’s status in Afghanistan and by analyzing two Youtube documentaries on women’s imprisonment, we argue that 12 years after the US-led intervention, women are still suffering from traditional and tribal laws. This paper seeks to demonstrate that untraditional education is a “sine qua non” for the women of Afghanistan to overcome negative aspects of tradition and tribal laws.


Full Text: PDF DOI: 10.5539/ies.v7n3p60

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International Education Studies ISSN 1913-9020 (Print), ISSN 1913-9039 (Online)

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