Effects of Individual and Work Environment Characteristics on Training Effectiveness: Evidence from Skill Certification System for Automotive Industry in Thailand

Tassanee Homklin, Yoshi Takahashi, Kriengkrai Techakanont

Abstract


Previous research over the past two decades has argued Kirkpatrick’s model ignored the work environment and individual factors influencing training effectiveness. A focus of this study is to investigate four levels of Kirkpatrick’s model with a focus on moderating the influences of individual and work environment characteristic variables, which are learning motivation, self-efficacy, motivation to transfer, and social support. In the present study, we used path analysis to test the hypotheses. The results of this study expand our understanding of the progressive causal relationship of reaction, learning, and behavior to results. In particular, this study confirms the influence of the individual and work environment characteristic on training outcomes and it has implications for enhancing training effectiveness. Although the result of motivation to transfer as a moderating variable has negative effects on the relationship between learning and behavior, social support directly affects behavior change after training and moderates the relationship between learning and behavior. Furthermore, future research on training evaluation should consider the training design variables beyond the training course that may have interfered with the training outcomes.


Full Text: PDF DOI: 10.5539/ibr.v6n12p1

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

International Business Research  ISSN 1913-9004 (Print), ISSN 1913-9012 (Online)

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